Author : A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Xenophon

Greek,  Soldier
Total Quotes : 25
Pleasure Most Eats

He who eats with most pleasure is he who least requires sauce.

- Xenophon

Sympathy Madness Living

Excess of grief for the dead is madness; for it is an injury to the living, and the dead know it not.

- Xenophon

Fast Accuracy Fine

Fast is fine, but accuracy is everything.

- Xenophon

I Think Dangers Least

For myself, I think that those who cultivate wisdom and believe themselves able to instruct their fellow-citizens as to their interests are least likely to become partisans of violence. They are too well aware that to violence attach enmities and dangers, whereas results as good may be obtained by persuasion safely and amicably.

- Xenophon

Beauty More Compulsion

For what the horse does under compulsion, as Simon also observes, is done without understanding; and there is no beauty in it either, any more than if one should whip and spur a dancer.

- Xenophon

Beauty Will Splendor

A horse is a thing of beauty... none will tire of looking at him as long as he displays himself in his splendor.

- Xenophon

Other Though Advanced

Cyrus was observed to have more docility than any of his years and to show more submission to those of an advanced age than any other children, though of a condition inferior to his own.

- Xenophon

Him Another Proportion

Let a man sow a field or plant a farm never so well, yet he cannot foretell who will gather in the fruits; another may build him a house of fairest proportion, yet he knows not who will inhabit it.

- Xenophon

Strong Which Very

For drink, there was beer which was very strong when not mingled with water, but was agreeable to those who were used to it. They drank this with a reed, out of the vessel that held the beer, upon which they saw the barley swim.

- Xenophon

Wisdom Sounds Sweetest

The sweetest of all sounds is praise.

- Xenophon

Learning Nothing Brought

All the children of the great men in Persia are brought up at court, where they have an opportunity of learning great modesty, and where nothing immodest is ever heard or seen.

- Xenophon

Away Housing Before

A Persian army being then subject to great inconveniences, for their horses are tied and generally shackled to prevent them from running away, and if an alarm happens, a Persian has the housing to fix, his horse to bridle, and his corslet to put on before he can mount.

- Xenophon

Words Impossible Practice

I see that it is impossible to remember a long poem without practice and repetition; so is forgetfulness of the words of instruction engendered in the heart that has ceased to value them.

- Xenophon

Other Lifetime Benefits

Socrates gave a lifetime to the outpouring of his substance in the shape of the greatest benefits bestowed on all who cared to receive them. In other words, he made those who lived in his society better men and sent them on their way rejoicing.

- Xenophon

Leader Own Forced

The true test of a leader is whether his followers will adhere to his cause from their own volition, enduring the most arduous hardships without being forced to do so, and remaining steadfast in the moments of greatest peril.

- Xenophon

Laws Considered Appointed

Wherever magistrates were appointed from among those who complied with the injunctions of the laws, Socrates considered the government to be an aristocracy.

- Xenophon

Education Teacher Will

I will venture to maintain that where the teacher is not pleasing to the pupil, there is no education.

- Xenophon

Small Will May

There is small risk a general will be regarded with contempt by those he leads, if, whatever he may have to preach, he shows himself best able to perform.

- Xenophon

Enemy Overcome Own

If any among you covet riches, let him endeavour to overcome, for the victorious not only preserve their own possessions but acquire those of the enemy.

- Xenophon

Against Till Declare

You see that even the enemy did not dare to declare war against us till they had seized our generals, for they were sensible that, while we had commanders and yielded obedience to them, we were able to conquer them; but, having seized our commanders, they concluded that we should, from a want of command and discipline, be destroyed.

- Xenophon